OLOPATADINE EYE DROPS — Description

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  MJ 4 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #491

    MJ
    Moderator

    Olopatadine eye drops is in a class of medications called antihistamines. It is used to treat itching of the eye caused by a condition known as allergic conjunctivitis (pink eye). It works by preventing the effects of certain inflammatory substances, which are produced by cells in your eyes and sometimes cause allergic reactions.

    To instill the eye drops, these steps are to be followed:
    1. Wash your hands. Tilt your head back and, pressing your finger gently on the skin just beneath the lower eyelid, pull the lower eyelid away from the eye to make a space. Drop the medicine into this space. Let go of the eyelid and gently close the eye. Do not blink. Keep the eye closed for 1 or 2 minutes to allow the medicine to cover the eye.
    2. If you think you did not get the drop of medicine into your eye properly, repeat the directions with another drop.
    3. To keep the medicine as germ-free as possible, do not touch the applicator tip to any surface (including the eye). Also, keep the container tightly closed.

    #577

    luisedwards112
    Participant

    How long will it take for the olopatadine eye drop to start working?

    #578

    MJ
    Moderator

    This eye drop can reduce the itchiness of your eye as early as 30 minutes from the time you have instilled the medication in your eye.

    #579

    luisedwards112
    Participant

    Okay, I’m starting to worry that the medication isn’t working. But it has only been 20 minutes since I instilled it. I guess I’ll just wait then.

    #580

    luisedwards112
    Participant

    Btw, can this be used more than once a day?

    #584

    MJ
    Moderator

    This eye drop can reduce the itchiness of your eye as early as 30 minutes from the time you have instilled the medication in your eye.

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